kileyrae:

“After the tragedy in Newtown, Hinna, age 8, wrote President Obama a letter asking him to take action on gun violence. Today, she joined the President at the White House as he announced his plan.”

kileyrae:

“After the tragedy in Newtown, Hinna, age 8, wrote President Obama a letter asking him to take action on gun violence. Today, she joined the President at the White House as he announced his plan.”

(via barackobama)

Looks like Obama’s keeping Gitmo, they just can’t close it- it’s the Olive Garden of prisons; it gets terrible reviews but somehow stays open. @billmaher (via brooklynmutt)

(via brooklynmutt)

They’re a bunch of jackasses. Every one of the 67 who voted no are nothing more than pawns of a philosophy that is not backed up by facts.

Former New York Sen. Al D’Amato rips 67 GOP congressmen who voted ‘no’ to Hurricane Sandy relief bill - NY Daily News

image

(via brooklynmutt)

Republican President Dwight Eisenhower’s idea of a significant marginal rate cut was to push the top rate down to 91 percent from 92 percent. Corporate taxes hit 50 percent. Jobs proliferated, wages rose, and the economy prospered. 1950s Tax Fantasy Is a Republican Nightmare - Bloomberg (via brooklynmutt)

(via brooklynmutt)

think-progress:

Chris Christie had a lot to say about House Republicans blocking Hurricane Sandy relief.

But if you watch one clip today, watch this.

(via brooklynmutt)

What if we start calling them semi-automatic assault vaginas with extended gay marriages?? Then they’ll be certain to regulate the crap out of them. — Opinionated Democrat (http://www.facebook.com/OpinionatedDemocrat)

(via apoplecticskeptic)

inothernews:

Even more ironic that they couldn’t get it up to vote for it.

As with guns, some auto deaths are caused by people who break laws or behave irresponsibly. But we don’t shrug and say, “Cars don’t kill people, drunks do.” Instead, we have required seat belts, air bags, child seats and crash safety standards. We have introduced limited licenses for young drivers and tried to curb the use of mobile phones while driving. All this has reduced America’s traffic fatality rate per mile driven by nearly 90 percent since the 1950s. Some of you are alive today because of those auto safety regulations. And if we don’t treat guns in the same serious way, some of you and some of your children will die because of our failure. Nicholas Kristof (via azspot)

(via kateoplis)

I have been largely silent on the issue of gun violence over the past six years, and I am now as sorry for that as I am for what happened to the families who lost so much in this most recent, but sadly not isolated, tragedy. The National Rifle Association has spent untold millions of dollars instilling fear in our citizens and our politicians. I believe it is more rational to fear guns far more than the illusory political power of the N.R.A. — Rep. John Yarmuth of Kentucky, a moderate Democrat who has shied away from discussions of gun control, has come out in favor of action on firearm safety and control policy. He is joined by other moderates like West Virginia pro-gun rights Democrat Joe Manchin, who says that “everything should be on the table.”  (via thepoliticalnotebook)

kateoplis:

“One irony of the pernicious taboo on “politicizing” a tragedy is that in some especially thorny areas of policy—like, for instance, gun control—it is only a tragedy that can summon the political momentum for change. The original Gun Control Act passed in October 1968, following the demoralizing assassinations of Bobby Kennedy and Martin Luther King, Jr. The Brady Act owes its existence to the unsuccessful attempt on the life of Ronald Reagan.

But by 2011, when Gabrielle Giffords narrowly survived a bullet in the head, the dynamic of the debate had changed. “After the Giffords shooting, I thought something would happen with gun control,” a recently retired official from the Bureau of Alcohol Tobacco and Firearms told me last summer. But nothing did. “Apparently, a member of Congress doesn’t count,” he said. “So now I’m wondering, what exactly does it take? Another Presidential assassination?”

What does it take? If a congresswoman in a coma isn’t sufficient grounds to reëvaluate the role that firearms play in our national life, is a schoolhouse full of dead children? I desperately want to believe that it is, and yet I’m not sure that I do. By this time next week, most of the people who are, today, signing petitions and demanding gun control will have moved on to other things. If you want to understand why the gun debate can occasionally feel rigged, this is the answer: the issue is characterized by a conspicuous asymmetry of fervor. The N.R.A. has only four million members—a number that is probably dwarfed by the segment of the U.S. population that feels uneasy about the unbridled proliferation of firearms. But the pro-gun constituency is ardent and organized, while the gun control crowd is diffuse and easily distracted. […]

[T]here are a number of important legislative adjustments that could be enacted now, which would likely have a dramatic impact on public safety in this country. One obvious change would be to mandate a criminal background check for all gun purchases. Under the Brady Act, federally licensed gun retailers are required to do a background check before selling a customer a firearm. But an estimated forty per cent of gun sales today are “private” sales not involving a licensed dealer: these transactions take place at gun shows, in parking lots, and increasingly, on the Internet. (One site, gunbroker.com, reported two billion dollars in sales this year.) Private sales do not require a background check, and because there is no mechanism for the A.T.F. to collect or maintain records on these sales, they are virtually untraceable. There are bills pending on Capitol Hill that would force checks for all sales, and there is considerable bipartisan support for this kind of measure. According to some recent polling conducted by Frank Luntz, seventy-four per cent of N.R.A. members and eighty-seven per cent of non-N.R.A. gun owners support requiring criminal background checks for anyone purchasing a gun.

Another fix would be to ban high-capacity magazines. It’s not clear yet whether the Connecticut shooter used a jumbo magazine, but given the body count, and the fact that at least some of the victims were reportedly shot multiple times, it seems quite like likely that he did. High-capacity magazines were a feature in the Giffords shooting, at Virginia Tech, and at Fort Hood. The gunman in Aurora was able to shoot seventy people in under two minutes because his AR-15 had a one-hundred-round drum. An outright ban would provoke significant political opposition, and raise questions about what to do with large magazines already in circulation. But with his extraordinary rhetorical powers, Obama should surely be able to articulate that the only non-military context in which a high-capacity magazine proves decisively useful for the shooter is one in which you are trying to mow down as many civilians as possible before you get killed by a SWAT team.”

Read on: Making Gun Control Happen | The New Yorker

thepoliticalnotebook:

On Meet The Press just a few minutes ago… Sen. Feinstein announces intentions to introduce legislation to ban assault weapons when the new Congress begins. 
[Twitter]

thepoliticalnotebook:

On Meet The Press just a few minutes ago… Sen. Feinstein announces intentions to introduce legislation to ban assault weapons when the new Congress begins. 

[Twitter]