I’ve been watching pundit after pundit talk about how they didn’t see the enthusiasm for Obama that they did in 2008 and were therefore confused by the turnout on election day.

mar-see-ah:

I think they don’t quite understand what Obama did in 2008. He didn’t just give speeches that showed him as a charismatic, intelligent leader, he educated us. And while I was involved with politics before (my father was a politician and I worked on several campaigns, including extensively in 2004), I never saw my peers caring -deeply caring- about the elections before 2008. But after Obama we cared about politics - not politics, actually, issues.

And once you care about issues you don’t go back.

And the issues haven’t changed much since 2008. Gay rights. Middle class. Women’s rights. Those are things that my peers care about.

We weren’t polled because we’re not considered likely voters. Oh, those 18-32 year olds? Especially the childless ones? Who cares what they think. But we do think. And we do vote. And we vote our values - liberal values. Even my husband, one of the least political people I know (weird, right?) was calling people on the eve of the election, reminding them to vote, talking to them about issues, and making an effort.

While I’ll always be an Obama true believer, I love how he awoke a generation to politics, showing them that they can effect change, that yes we can make a difference in our future.

And that’s my favorite thing about Obama.

Very well said.

theatlantic:

Red State, Blue City: How the Urban-Rural Divide is Splitting America

The new political divide is a stark division between cities and what remains of the countryside. Not just some cities and some rural areas, either — virtually every major city (100,000-plus population) in the United States of America has a different outlook from the less populous areas that are closest to it. The difference is no longer aboutwherepeople live, it’s abouthowpeople live: in spread-out, open, low-density privacy — or amid rough-and-tumble, in-your-face population density and diverse communities that enforce a lower-common denominator of tolerance among inhabitants.
The voting data suggest that people don’t make cities liberal — cities make people liberal.

Read more. [Image: Robert Vanderbai]

theatlantic:

Red State, Blue City: How the Urban-Rural Divide is Splitting America

The new political divide is a stark division between cities and what remains of the countryside. Not just some cities and some rural areas, either — virtually every major city (100,000-plus population) in the United States of America has a different outlook from the less populous areas that are closest to it. The difference is no longer aboutwherepeople live, it’s abouthowpeople live: in spread-out, open, low-density privacy — or amid rough-and-tumble, in-your-face population density and diverse communities that enforce a lower-common denominator of tolerance among inhabitants.

The voting data suggest that people don’t make cities liberal — cities make people liberal.

Read more. [Image: Robert Vanderbai]

Tonight in Maine, Maryland and Washington, the movement for marriage equality took on its opponents, on their field, under their rules and defeated them. Ta-Nehisi Coates (via theatlantic)

(via theatlantic)

imwithkanye:

The Empire State Building Calls The Election.

imwithkanye:

The Empire State Building Calls The Election.

If there is a God, Mitt Romney will finish with 47% of the vote. @JohnFugelsang (via apoplecticskeptic)
Ok, what’s next?

President Bartlett Obama (via apoplecticskeptic)

Golf clap.

There is no such thing as gender equality without reproductive freedom. VOTE.

(via kateoplis)

This is the end of daylight savings time tonight. It’s Mitt Romney’s favorite time of year because he gets to turn the clock back. Joe Biden, at a campaign stop in Colorado over the weekend. (via liberalsarecool)
liberalsarecool:

Mitt’s time is up.

liberalsarecool:

Mitt’s time is up.

barackobama:

Iowa votes early.

New favorite political anything.

barackobama:

Iowa votes early.

New favorite political anything.

peterfeld:

Romney vs. Sandy: brutal ad by ClimateScience I wish everyone could see by Tuesday.

I’m reblogging this again.  Vin Scully once said that the most powerful weapon he has as a broadcaster is silence.  Never more true than in this ad.

apoplecticskeptic:

I’m voting for Barack Obama because, as this list of Romney endorsers suggests, the candidates for White House performance invites and Kennedy Center honors under a Romney administration would be a national embarrassment from which we’d likely never recover on the international stage of respectability and relevance.
I mean, seriously people… get out and vote. For the sake of art and music and beauty.
source: Wikipedia list of Romney endorsers

apoplecticskeptic:

I’m voting for Barack Obama because, as this list of Romney endorsers suggests, the candidates for White House performance invites and Kennedy Center honors under a Romney administration would be a national embarrassment from which we’d likely never recover on the international stage of respectability and relevance.

I mean, seriously people… get out and vote. For the sake of art and music and beauty.

source: Wikipedia list of Romney endorsers

When I step into the voting booth, I think about the world I want to leave my two daughters, and the values that are required to guide us there. The two parties’ nominees for president offer different visions of where they want to lead America.
One believes a woman’s right to choose should be protected for future generations; one does not. That difference, given the likelihood of Supreme Court vacancies, weighs heavily on my decision.
One recognizes marriage equality as consistent with America’s march of freedom; one does not. I want our president to be on the right side of history.
Michael Bloomberg just endorsed Obama. (via theatlantic)

(via theatlantic)